Login
<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 16 Nov 2017 12:57 PM | MC C (Administrator)


    Success is such a personal concept – we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?

    I find success in growth. The growth of my skill set, as a designer, as well as my personal growth as a young professional navigating the music industry.  

    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry - What are your top three tips?

    Observe excellence and be excellent. In the beginning, be a fly on the wall and observe the people around you, listen to what they’re saying, and pay attention to what works. I wouldn’t be where I am if it wasn’t for my excellent mentors I have had the privilege to learn from.

    Ask for what you want and what you deserve. Rarely do people just give you what you want or deserve, so you need to stand up for yourself and communicate what you want or believe you deserve.

    Find a side hustle. Find ways to get involved in the music industry outside of your 9 to 5. It’s a great way to network with other people and gain outside experience.

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    I’ve always been an artistic person and took a lot of art and design classes throughout school that have helped refine my eye as a designer. Also, I’ve had a few internships that have allowed me to gain the music industry experience I needed to work at Roc Nation.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?

    The biggest challenge I’ve faced recently, having been working now just over year, has been finding the appropriate work-life balance for me. I’m finding out that it is very different for everyone and that it’s important to prioritize your health over everything.  

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    The most valuable lesson I’ve learned has been to know my worth. Self-doubt is inevitable when you look around and there are so many successful people in this world. But I now understand that my success is a unique journey and I need to be proud of what I’ve accomplished and be vocal about it.

    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    I believe the industry is still male-dominated. And as a Latin woman, that can be intimidating. I frequently catch myself apologizing for all kinds of things that don’t make sense. Never apologize for taking up space or for being successful.  

    Who inspires you, and why?

    My Art Director, Michelle, who I work with every day, inspires me the absolute most. She has so much experience in our field and her knowledge of our craft seems endless. Her direction while working on projects inspires me to be better and look at things differently.  

    What do you look forward to accomplishing at Roc Nation in the next year?

    I look forward to designing album packaging for artists. I design mostly for digital, but I would like more experience designing for physical releases. Also, I look forward to stepping into more of a Junior Art Director role, assisting our Art Director at photo shoots.

    Tell us more about how you got involved in Roc Nation? What is your ultimate goal and what do you need to take it to the next level?

    My ultimate goal is to build my career at Roc Nation. This is where I got my start interning, and I have been in love with the company since Day One. My plan is to continue to work hard, stay dedicated, and time will tell what the next step is for me.

    You can follow Dominique

    Instagram @ domalommm  

    LinkedIn @  https://www.linkedin.com/in/dfalcone94/

    and check her portfolio at www.dominiquefalcone.com




  • 09 Nov 2017 2:21 PM | MC C (Administrator)


    Steph Quaye is a music professional committed to building community through music. In addition to being a singer/songwriter, she manages an Afrobeat/pop collective called People’s Champs, and has recently joined the Board of Women in Music as an Events Chair. She currently helps lead operations for all performing arts programming at BRIC, a non-profit arts organization in downtown Brooklyn, N.Y.


    Success is such a personal concept – we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?


    To me, success means having the resources -—time, energy, money — to create the life that I want for myself. That involves me producing (and supporting the production of) music and engaging events that allow people to build genuine connections with each other. I want to put all that I have into celebrating art and building intentional community, as they are both fundamental to how I view the world personally and professionally.


    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry - What are your top three tips?

    — Have conversations with people who are doing the work you’re interested in doing.

    — Ask thoughtful questions.

    — Don’t let perceived differences get in the way of building new relationships.

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    I left my home in N.J. when I was 13 years old to attend a boarding high school in New Hampshire — no, I wasn’t a troublemaker! Being in such an academically and socially intense environment taught me the importance of managing my time and communicating well with different kinds of people. In addition to my ‘day job,’ I’m involved with a number of organizations that have me working on many different projects simultaneously, so I rely on those time management and communication skills every day.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?

    While music has always been a big part of my life, it wasn’t integrated into my career until about tw0 years ago. My professional life centered around business and accounting — I’m a licensed CPA and used to work at a Big Four accounting firm— while my personal life was where I expressed myself musically through writing and performing. A major challenge I faced was coming to terms with the fact that, though I was at a great firm and had a ‘stable’ career, I wasn’t happy with what my life looked like. Leaving behind a career that I had spent many years preparing for was incredibly scary, but it was important that my professional life engage my creative and analytical skills equally. I’m glad I made the leap!

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    The most valuable lesson I’ve learned is to do what I can, with what I have, to leave spaces better than I found them. This was a part of the ethos of a choir that I was a part of when I lived in Boston (hey Kuumba!), and it has been my personal philosophy ever since. By focusing on contributing in both large and small ways to any space that I occupy, I’ve created meaningful relationships and been offered great opportunities. It’s often the little things that get you noticed and open doors.

    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    Feeling like they have to make themselves smaller to accommodate the egos of people in power. We’ve got to take up more space, ladies!

    Who inspires you, and why?

    Writer, director, and actress Issa Rae is a huge inspiration to me. She has built her career by creating nuanced stories featuring characters of color in a refreshing way and has done so on her own terms. I want my music and the events I produce to be similarly engaging and relevant, and seeing her thrive has definitely encouraged me.

    What do you look forward to accomplishing in the next year?

    Layered vocals bring me immense joy and I’ve performed background vocals for some amazing artists on varied stages — from C’mon Everybody in Brooklyn, N.Y. to Bonnaroo in Manchester, Tenn. While I love supporting other artists, I want to continue to explore my artistry and share my musical perspective with the world. New tunes are coming soon, so look out for them!

    What is your ultimate goal and what do you need to take it to the next level?

    My ultimate goal is to not only produce creative and memorable live music experiences, but also to help musicians build community around their work. In order to take it to the next level, I need to connect with like-minded professionals with great ideas — let’s collaborate!


    You can follow Stephanie at:






  • 31 Oct 2017 3:54 PM | MC C (Administrator)



    With a lifetime love of music and a natural pull towards advertising, Moira McCarthy has spent her career pursuing her passions.  After half a decade consulting on multicultural advertising campaigns, ranging from Coca-Cola to Nike, Moira moved onto Audio Network, Inc., where, during her tenure, she was responsible for fostering the company's presence in the U.S. market through business development, marketing, and creative leadership. At Audio Network she played a key role in placing the music for the Volvo social media campaign, “The Greatest Interception,” which won the 2015 Cannes Direct Lions Grand Prix for Volvo and Grey Worldwide. Her roster of agency clients included Droga5, BBDO, Havas, Leo Burnett, McCann, KBS+P, Y&R, McCann, and many others.


    She is now leading business development, marketing, and music for GrupoSpiro, a global production company specializing in entertainment and brand partnerships stretching from music placement to groundbreaking experiential events.

    Success is such a personal concept — we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?I define my professional success in having the privilege to be stimulated creatively and work doing something I love every day, with amazing talent surrounding me.

    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry - What are your top three tips?   

    First, never be above any job in the industry because there is absolutely always something you can learn from it. The second would be the complement to that: Know your worth and do not be afraid to confidently ask for just compensation and treatment.

    Third — build true friendships in the industry; the hours can be long and the work grueling at times, and those friendships make each day, even the hard ones, a blast.

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    A career as a college athlete and working through jobs that I despised early in my working years taught me the value of self-discipline and patience. On a personal level, the amazing support of my family to pursue my dreams has been a huge driver of success.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?

    Navigating a professional life in my early twenties was exceptionally challenging and I faced a ton of obstacles, but to name a few: insane hours, unwelcome sexual advances, and rampant unprofessionalism. The consequences of being too afraid to stand up for myself then taught me a lot about gracefully but confidently standing up for myself later in my career. Though much has improved in the past decade, we still have a long way to go and I feel strongly that banding together, the women of the music industry can change the narrative long-term.

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    Always, always, ALWAYS take the high road.

    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    Enormous and serious issues still challenge women everywhere in the workplace, especially when it comes to equal pay and women’s rights. But I’m inclined to think the most pressing day-to-day obstacle is the pressure to be one step ahead. There is always another show, another event, another conference, and I think a lot of women still feel the need to work triple overtime in order to achieve their goals in our primarily male-driven industry. The hustle is wildly important, but so is sleep. Work your ass off, but also know that the flu and a temperature of 102 doesn’t belong at Mercury Lounge on a Tuesday night.  

    Who inspires you, and why?

    My mother — the strongest, most resilient, most optimistic woman I have (and am confident will ever) meet. Also, Oprah and Beyonce, for very obvious and wonderful reasons.

    You can follow Moira at:

    Instagram: @litandwhimsy

    Twitter: @litandwhimsy



  • 27 Oct 2017 1:37 PM | MC C (Administrator)


    Success is such a personal concept – we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?


    For me, balance is everything. I’ve never been the kind of person who has one specific, be-all-end-all dream, and subsequently, I have a zillion interests and ambitions. While I do feel that’s what makes life so amazing, it also means I usually have about a million of those zillion things up in the air at any given time. I think that when I can manage to balance, let's say, 10 of those things up in the air, and still have a smile on, I can count that as success.


    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry? What are your top three tips?


    1. Don’t take it personally

    2. Play to your strengths

    3. Know everything there is to know about everything


    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?


    This is a huge question, because I feel like success can’t really be measured in terms of ‘I’m successful today,’ but rather all the personal and professional experiences I’ve had so far have been sprinkled with moments of success. That’s hard to realize in our goal-oriented industry, but it’s the way life is, and it’s so important to stop every now and then in the midst of it all and celebrate the successes.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?


    I reached a point last year where I was stuck. I wasn’t sure I wanted to move forward along the career trajectory I had set for myself, but I also wasn’t sure what else there was to do. So, I started talking to as many people as I could to figure out next steps. For me, it was applying to business school, where I am now,  and I think I made the absolute right decision. But for anyone, that moment of recognizing you don’t want to go down the path ahead, and making the decision to either pivot or run in the opposite direction, that's always the toughest, but also the most important part of working towards your goals.

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?


    Just because someone says you can’t do something doesn’t mean that you have to back down. You can always find a way to make your life what you want it to be.

    Who inspires you and why?


    Honestly, I’m amazed by so many people in this world that it’s hard to pick just one. But right now I love Cindy Gallop. She gives these amazing and totally inspiring speeches, mainly to women, where she talks about her career in the advertising world and the hurdles she overcame, and gives the best, no-nonsense answers at Q&As I’ve ever heard. I’m hoping she’d approve of my answers in this one!


    How did you get involved at CBS? What is your ultimate goal and what do you need to take it to the next level?  What do you look forward to accomplishing at Columbia Business School in the next year?


    I studied English and Art History in undergrad, and have always been more liberal arts inclined. But I needed a way to expand my horizons in the business world. I decided that business school offered me the concrete tools and connections to make that transition, and I applied!

    I’m looking forward to so many things at CBS, but I think most of all, I can’t wait to experience as many different career paths as I possibly can. It’s so rare to have the time and opportunity to stop and actually decide what to do with our lives, I am not going to leave any rock unturned.


    You can follow Emma on Instagram at @hamsterfeed

  • 24 Oct 2017 8:06 PM | MC C (Administrator)

    When you hear “Girl, You'll Be A Woman Soon” do you think of Pulp Fiction? How about Cyndi Lauper’s “Time After Time”? Probably Romy and Michele's High School Reunion, right? What about The Kills' "The Last Goodbye"? Are you running to buy Under Armour ala Michael Phelps? 

    A well-placed song can raise the emotional connection and significance of an on-screen scene in a way that stays with us. So how does that song make it into that scene? What did the writer do to put themselves in a good position to be considered for such a magnificent moment? 

    In our panel discussion on crafting commercial music, we will hear from leaders in the major label and sync industry on the process of writing music with the aim of making a huge impact (through sync, landing a major label deal, and more).  From a label A&R song-focused perspective, music supervisors in charge of finding music for big-name productions, and a media company licensing tracks every day,  these women are at the TOP of their game and ready to share tricks of their trade. Their expertise and well-developed ears give them great insight into how writers, managers, publishers, and A&Rs in the industry today can point themselves towards mainstream success.

    In addition to the talk, we will host a live demo constructive critique of music submitted by WIM LA members and UCLA students. The panel will listen to 30-second song clips and give live feedback on the overall commercial and sync-ability of the tracks. They will share inside tips on what they look for, what trends to follow, and how to write music that speaks to the masses. 

    PANELISTS:  
    Wendy Goldstein - EVP, A&R @ Republic Records 
    Rachel Levy - SVP, Film Music @ Universal Pictures 
    Kasey Truman - Music Supervisor @ ChopShop 
    Lauren Ross - Co-Founder @ Terrorbird Publishing 
    Moderator: Robyn Booker - Snr Director, Film/TV Music @ Downtown Music Publishing 

    DETAILS 
    Date and Time: Monday, November 13, 2017 | 7pm to 9pm PT 
    Location:
    The Jan Popper Theater, UCLA Campus (Westwood) 
    445 Charles E Young Dr E, Los Angeles, CA 90095
    Parking: The closest parking on campus is Garage 2 - then make your way inside the Schoenberg Music Building where you will find the Jan Popper Theater. Campus Map here.

    PARTNERS 
    Thank you to our amazing partners - we couldn’t do it without you! 
    UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music 
    UCLA Radio 
    Output 

    ATTEND: 
    This event is only open to active WIM LA members and UCLA Students. If you are not one of those you must join to attend! 

    WIM LA Members and UCLA Students can RSVP:http://wimlaucla.eventbrite.com 

    HAVE YOUR SONG CRITIQUED: 
     If you’re interested in having your song played and reviewed by the panelists during the session (and you are an active WIM member OR UCLA Student) you can submit your song here by November 2nd. 

    Please note the following:

    • Songs submitted after the deadline will not be considered.
    • You must be present at the session to have your song considered for review.
    • Songs will be selected at random and while we can't guarantee we will have time for all songs we will choose a cross-section of genres and aim to get as many in as possible. 
    • Song submissions and tickets are open to WIM Members and UCLA students ONLY. RSVPs and submissions will be cross-referenced and you will be removed from the list if you are not a WIM member or UCLA student. 

      Can't wait to see you there!  

          xo

         WIM LA 


  • 19 Oct 2017 11:24 AM | MC C (Administrator)


    Jessie Massabni is no stranger to WIM - she is the Membership Director that services all of our nearly 2000 members!  We sat down with Jessie to learn about her history and hear her advice for advancing as a Woman in Music.

    Tell us about yourself: How did you get involved in the industry and how did you get involved with WIM?

    I’ve always been passionate about music. It’s fascinating to see how music can bring people together, create memories and no matter what language you speak and where you are in the world it is a powerful medium that connects us all.

    I started writing songs when I was living in Canada and decided to move to New York to pursue my passion. Being new in the city, WIM played a big part in my life. I joined WIM about two years ago and was amazed by all the opportunities the organization offers and how it truly focuses on its members with a core mission to help and see everyone thrive in their career. As a member, I was so grateful for the knowledge I gained and the connections I made along the way. I was excited for the opportunity to join the Women In Music team, seeing the impact it had on me I wanted to be part of something bigger that can help others.

    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry - What are your top three tips?

    Work smart - have a clear/specific vision of what you want to achieve. Create daily goals and never be afraid to make that call or knock on doors you'll be surprised how far this can bring you. Make quick decisions and trust your instinct.

    Patience - everything takes time and connecting all the little dots you create along the way will bring you closer to your goal.

    Persevere - no matter how hard sometimes it gets never give up. Keep going even though you don’t know if you are on the right track; keep going, everything will make sense as long as you persevere, have patience and work smart.

    Last but not least, support one another - helping someone can go a long way without expecting it.

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    My experiences helped me grow, gain strength and confidence, which lead me to set a clear vision of my goals and brought me closer to my purpose. No matter what I am going through I am always learning and that itself is a blessing.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?

    There will always be challenges to overcome at different phases of a career. They are part of the journey that determines if you are ready for what’s to come. One challenge was finding my true purpose and that clear/specific vision of what I wanted while staying authentic and true to who I am. Basically knowing your worth and value without settling for less.

    Another challenge is making fast decisions. I’m a perfectionist and I tend to dwell on it. I’ve taught and pushed myself to decide in the present moment and surprisingly it always ends up being the best decision. When you make a fast decision you follow your heart and don’t have time to overthink so you basically are being true to yourself and save so much time which is the most valuable asset in life. Some choices might not lead you to the result you want but it’ll teach you a lot so you can never fail. You always win in some ways.

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    Always be humble, grateful and curious.

    What has been your favorite thing about being apart of this industry and WIM?

    I’ve always been told that the music industry is competitive but what I’ve discovered is the contrary. It is a community that thrives on collaborating and helping each other, which is definitely my favorite thing about being part of this industry and WIM.

    Who inspires you, and why?

    People! Everyone I meet inspires me in some ways.

    What do you look forward to accomplishing in the next year?  What do you need to achieve that goal? (this of this is an ask of anyone reading).

    I’m working on a few exciting songwriting projects and I’m always looking to collaborate with passionate artists and producers while continuing on being part of and working with WIM as it expands and helps members around the world. I’m looking forward to help and inspire more and more people in this coming year.

    You can follow Jessie at:

    Instagram: @JessieMassabni 

    Twitter: @JessieMassabni 

    Youtube: @JessieMassabni 


  • 16 Oct 2017 4:16 PM | MC C (Administrator)


    "Speak it, Make a Plan, and get it done!" This is the mantra and life philosophy of Houston native Erika Smith. In business and in life, her goal is simple — to create new waves and to ride the ones that head her way.

    Success is such a personal concept – we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?

    I've learned to look inward with regards to success. What are my goals? How can I do my best? If I always look at other people to define my success, then I'll never feel successful. Maybe it's not ‘the industry way’ of looking at it, but it's the way I've been able to practice self-care in an environment that puts self last.

    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry. What are your top three tips?

    A)If you demand seat at the table, you better be ready to bring it. I know for me, I'm so used to ‘fighting’ for my seat at the table that I forget about the real process. What you do at the table matters just as much, if not more, than fighting for a seat at the table.

    B) Give yourself permission to “SELL YOURSELF!!!!” Men do this easily and they tend to speak more highly of themselves. We tend to talk down our accomplishments and overlook our talents.

    C) It's okay if you can't do it all at the SAME TIME. We can do whatever we put our mind to but maybe part of doing it all is not doing it at the same time. I'm at that place now in my career.

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    Interesting question. I'm sure it's all played a role, but it's kind of hard to pinpoint. For example, when I worked at the Talent Booking Agency, I shined because I know the Gospel Music world really well. I'm a follower of Christ from Houston, Texas, and prior to moving to NYC, I worked at a faith-based school. I never would have thought to connect the three (or four) but those experiences helped me to shine.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?

    My biggest challenge would be with myself — my mental. I believe that if you (I) can get your mind right, the rest is MUCH EASIER!

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    Most valuable?? That's a tough one. I guess the most recent valuable lesson I've learned is to not be afraid of the ‘NO.’ The Nos will lead to a ‘YES!’

    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    There’s not a lot of women in certain sectors of music, so the empathy for something is lacking. I lucked up a bit at my agency.  I was the only woman agent and they were very accommodating and supportive with my pregnancy. That's rare in this business.

    Who inspires you, and why?

    My former students and my son. I want them to see that ALL things are truly possible. If it can happen for me, it can definitely happen for them!

    What do you look forward to accomplishing at your company in the next year?

    This should answer the next two questions. I left Universal Attractions Agency to focus on motherhood. That time allowed me to really think about my first love, which is event planning, producing, and programming. I plan to focus my time and resources into that. It looks like working for a company, pursuing independent projects,and  just getting MY BUTT OUT THERE!!!

    You can follow Erika on:

    Instagram: @theakiregroup

    Twitter: @theakiregroup

    Facebook: @theakiregroup

  • 12 Oct 2017 11:16 AM | MC C (Administrator)


    Lindsay Herr is the founder and director of The Wanderlvst, a boutique Public Relations, Artist Management, and Consulting company based in Brooklyn, N.Y. She oversees a roster of artists in their career development, campaign creation, and media relationships. In addition to The Wanderlvst she is the co-creator of we are SUPERNATURAL, an immerse learning platform for deeply curious minds.

    Success is such a personal concept – we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?

    Success, to me, is freedom. Freedom to do what I love every day. It's being able to define the life I want to lead and the person I want to be. It's balancing work and play, and knowing the difference. Success, for me, is both the big and small accomplishments. It’s as simple as receiving a supportive email and as big as landing a massive deal.

    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry - What are your top three tips?

    Make meaningful connections, take failure as fuel to keep moving forward and stay enthusiastic about it; balance work and play.

    Adding one more because it's important — remain humble and grounded.

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    My career in music has been at the hands of flow and fate. I’ve moved forward through synchronistic experiences and encounters throughout my career, which has led to success in business and expansion for myself and my company.

    For example, it goes all the way back to how I landed in the music industry. I was heading to New York one summer in college to take a course at Parson’s School of Design, as I was an advertising major. One week before moving here, I was informed the class I enrolled in was full. I had my housing sorted and everything else lined up. Moments later —actual moments— I received an email from a boutique hip-hop management company, whose roster goes back to the days of The Notorious B.I.G., asking me if I’d like to come intern in New York for the summer. They had received my resume from my marketing internship leader the year before. It was an instant ‘yes,’ as I never imagined myself taking my biggest passion and turning it into career. Eight years later, I am grateful to say that I am exactly where I'm supposed to be. This, coupled with hard work, has been the ultimate adventure.  The rest of the journey is still unfolding.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?

    Imposter syndrome. It seems to be a recurring theme for many women and one I hear often. I sometimes need to remind myself of how far I’ve come and how grateful I am for all the opportunities and successes I’ve accomplished on my own.

    What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    Create your own lane. I’ve worked for big and small companies and I realized that in order to move at the speed I wanted to, I had to go out and make the opportunities happen for me one way or the other.

    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    Women in leadership roles. Certainly there are many women trailblazing, but it is still very much a male-dominated industry and boys club.

    Who inspires you, and why?

    My friends! I am thankful to be surrounded by such amazing humans doing incredible things every day. Staying in creative communities is the ultimate fuel to keep creating, building, and growing. And this is definitely out of the lane of music, but I'm quite nerdy and am very inspired by Elon Musk. As an entrepreneurial spirit, futurist, and generalist, I look up to his forward thinking ideas. 

    What do you look forward to accomplishing at The Wanderlvst in the next year?

    I am traveling for a bit come the new year and I look forward to taking my work on the road and to the creative inspiration that  lie ahead.


    Tell us more about how you got involved in The Wanderlvst. What is your ultimate goal and what do you need to take it to the next level?

    I started my company almost three years ago as a passion project while working at Warner Music Group, doing press for acts like Kygo and Thomas Jack while they were getting their start. The business blueprint is still unfolding. I like to take it day-by-day and I love the creative freedom I have to collaborate and work alongside others who are as passionate about creativity and music as I am. Not sure there is an ultimate goal or destination in mind, but as long as I can wake up each day, enjoying the work I do, make a meaningful impact on our society, and evolve both personally and professionally along the way, I'll be happy with that.

    For more info Lindsay's work, please see:

    https://www.thewanderlvst.com

    https://www.wearesupernatural.co


  • 03 Oct 2017 6:12 PM | MC C (Administrator)


    Nicole Holoboff currently works at United Talent Agency and has been working in the music industry since graduating from Whitman College in the wheat fields of Washington State. Though she was born in London and grew up in Hong Kong, New York City has always been her home, and her career in music and entertainment has brought her back to stay. Though she still has much to learn about the industry, mentorship, and professional development she has been lucky enough to meet some incredible women achieving fantastic success in music who inspire her everyday. Nicole has been a vice chair with WIM since January 2017 and values deeply the community that exists when women stick together in male-dominated industries, as well as the progress that can be achieved when women and men work together to achieve the advancement of women in this industry at every level.

    Success is such a personal concept – we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?

    I define success as achieving a balance between personal and professional happiness. As I grow up I see how many young women strive to find this balance as they work to maintain relationships (platonic and romantic) and strive for mental well-being. I have come to understand more than ever why this goal is so challenging to achieve, but also why it is a worthwhile goal to have that inspires you to work hard every day.  


    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry - What are your top three tips?


    A) Develop meaningful connections early, go beyond surface-level networking and really talk with people who you introduce yourself to.

    B) Always follow through on your word.

    C) Never have an inflated ego.  


    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?


    Every person I have ever worked with has taught me so much about work ethic, regarding hard work, being a leader, or keeping sane under pressure. Keeping notes, journals, and reflections about everything you experience while working and coming up in this industry has proven immensely helpful in digesting the information I consume daily, especially when processing emotionally/intellectually intense interactions that are tough to make sense of in the moment.


    Can you share with us some of the challenges you’ve faced?


    Having faith in myself and my personal direction has proven difficult. It is tough to remain confident when your goals or hopes are not yet fully formed, especially in an industry and city (NYC) where every person has an armor on that keeps you from seeing the real them and their insecurities. Holding on to your ability to know what is best for you and your goals while remaining honest with yourself is most important, and most challenging.  


     What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned?

    Get a mentor, or if you’re lucky, multiple mentors of various ages. Never think you can do anything on your own or without talking things through with those you love and respect. Always ask for advice and honest feedback where appropriate and acceptable.  


    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    Women being recognized for their work (professionally and personally – call your mother!!) and women in executive roles and leadership positions throughout companies. Similarly, women need to stand up for each other from small microaggressions to executive level salary negotiations as we stand in line together. I strongly believe women acting like men in the workplace does not further women in male dominated industries. Women must demand the space to be women without sacrificing what that means to her, and professional spaces must acclimate accordingly. This relates to childcare and respecting mothers (and fathers) who have children at home, or who need to bring their babies to the office. The rules need to bend to become more inclusive across the board, and it comes back to respecting and valuing women’s work.


    Who inspires you, and why?

    My mother, sister, and father.





  • 28 Sep 2017 12:48 PM | MC C (Administrator)


    Success is such a personal concept — we all see and define it differently. How did you personally define your success?

    If you can look back at a specific length of time — let's say a year — and see positive change, growth, and accomplishment, then to me that's success. I feel like there's a stigma that 'success' has to be something very huge and groundbreaking. But there's success that happens every day. Everyone deserves a pat on the back for any win — big or small. Success is always working toward a bigger picture.


    What advice would you give women who want to enter your side of the industry? What are your top three tips?


    Don't be afraid or discouraged about the word 'no'; Work to meet your goals a little bit each day; live fearlessly and tell yourself 'You're a boss' every morning!

    How have the personal and professional experiences in your life contributed to your success today?

    I contribute a lot of my success from never stopping and always finding something to put my energy toward — constantly moving from one opportunity to the next.

    Can you share with us some of the challenges you've faced?

    Probably one of the biggest challenges I've gone through is losing one of my closest co-workers in a traumatic car accident. Shortly following, everyone at the company lost their jobs. About two months after that, our former CEO unexpectedly passed away.

    What is the most valuable lesson you've learned?

    Life will always be full of challenges. Don't label something as 'difficult.' Difficult implies it can't be done. A challenge is something you overcome and work hard to achieve. Facing all your challenges makes new ones less intimidating.

    What do you think is the most pressing issue women in the music industry face in your region?

    Challenging the old music executive mindset.

    Who inspires you, and why?

    Beyonce!! QUEEN BEY! I'm just astounded at her ability to perform. Her old apartment is right across from my office, so if I'm ever feeling like I need a wake-up call, I go and look at it. Her gold fence is still there and visible from my floor so whenever I see it I'm reminded to push through my work and get shiiii done!

    What do you look forward to accomplishing at KLL MGMT in the next year?

    One of my artists, Best Behavior, is about to release their new EP this fall. We've received a lot of excitement and interest surrounding it, so I'm stoked for what's in store on the sophomore LP.

    Tell us more about how you got involved in KLL MGMT? What is your ultimate goal and what do you need to take it to the next level?

    I started my own MGMT and consulting business after my former CEO passed. I felt like I needed to be my own boss and be accountable for my success. I love, love, love working with artists and helping develop their careers. It's been a very rewarding experience to see each client's growth and seeing growth in myself as an artist manager, as well.



<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 

Upcoming events

Featured member

Upcoming events

Recent forum updates

  • There are no forum topics to display.

Women in Music, Inc. 322 West 57th Street. Suite 47H. New York, NY. 10019

© 2010 - 2016 Women in Music, Inc.®  All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use of the material herein may subject the user to civil or criminal liability.

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software